07.23.2003

The New York Video Festival @ Walter Reade

Topic(s): ongoing film screenings | No Comments

Date/Time: 23/07/2003 12:00 am


http://filmlinc.com/nyvf/nyvf.htm

It’s summertime – time for exploring the pleasures, both odd and profound, of the ethereal art of video. Investigate with us the mutant media spawned by video game engines. Discover new artists making the gallery scene. Check out new ways of using digital media. See how artists from many lands come to terms with their new homes. Witness politics and media converge – as if they’ve never done that before! Watch the passionate deconstruction of music videos. Meet video artists like Robert Frank, Alfred Guzzetti, and George Kuchar, as well as young upstarts. Flex your aesthetic muscles with a host of provocative new works. Videomakers are all over the map, out in force, taking a stand, making us laugh or cry, but mostly leaving us awestruck by the power of that little digital gadget. And we’ve got the tapes to prove it. This year’s edition of the world’s leading showcase dedicated to the most plastic and contemporary of art forms features works of all stripes exploring wide-ranging themes and viewpoints. With cameras in hand, these artists are capturing life as we know it or creating new realities for us to enjoy. So – enjoy!
PROGRAM ONE: INSIDE/OUTSIDE: THE SPIRITS OF PLACE
left: learning stalls
Personal Anthology – 88m
Whether bone dry or with attitude to spare, based on precise structural conceits or strung together without apparent logic, this collection of anthology format excursions mix it up.
Learning Stalls
Torsten Zenas Burns & Darrin Martin, U.S., 2003; 4 x 4m
The Chocolate Factory
Steve Reinke, Canada, 2002; 26m
Wasted
Scott Russell, Canada, 2003; 18m
Lost in Space
Tricia Middleton & Joel Taylor, Canada, 2003; 11m
Single Beds Vol. 1 Desolation
Ximena Cuevas, Mexico, 2002; 18m
Wed July 23: 6:15; Fri July 25: 4
PROGRAM TWO: GAME ENGINE
Annual sales of $11 billion and rising is one measure of the energy surging through the videogame industry. Your ardent devotion to your computer or console is another. A third is the rampant generation, often from the culture of the first-person shooter, of all the curious mutants you will see and hear about tonight. This program is a speedrun of new forms that games and gamers and gaming are driving. Wild and legendary cutscenes, recams, machinima, loops, remixes, and beyond. With commentary and special appearances by Katie Salen, Ze Frank, Cory Arcangel, Paul Marino, RedvsBlue, and more. Total Running Time: 90m.
Wed July 23: 9
PROGRAM THREE: GOING IN CIRCLES
left: london orbital
86m
London Orbital
Chris Petit and Iain Sinclair, U.K., 2002; 76m
An extraordinary and visionary work about the world’s largest bypass, the M25, London Orbital is a cinematic excursion into the futuristic literature of a century past, as well as a dialogue between two writers who are also filmmakers and vice versa. Within this dialogue they connect the dots of seemingly disparate themes – Bram Stoker’s Dracula, time and memory, the difference between film and tape, sound and image, trance states and the terror that lies beyond boredom, shopping and terrorism; Kabul and the leisure mall, plus Pinochet and Thatcher as vampire lovers.
Walking Off Court
George Barber, U.K., 2003; 10m
“It is 10 minutes long and concerns a story I saw in The Times about a tennis coach called James Goodman who had a nervous breakdown around about the time that a motorway was built right outside his house. He spent a lot of time aimlessly walking in circles around new roads and road works. I contacted him and even ended up playing tennis with him. The video is loosely the story around his experience and his changing relationship to his normal circumstances.”
Thurs July 24: 4; Sun July 27: 8:45
PROGRAM FOUR: STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND
left: permanent transit
97m
Every year 2 – 3 million people leave their country, and by the beginning of the 21st century 130 million people lived outside their homeland. Five videos capture the dreams, disappointments, achievements, fears, and hopes of some of them.
Permanent Transit
Mariam Ghani, 2001-2; 24m
A journey through 11 countries between East and West, a road movie on the state or rather statelessness of the exiled, the refugee, and the itinerant.
Underground: Letter from an Immigrant
Ashraf Meer, 2002; 8m
An expressionistic meditation on London, using “The Tube” (London’s subway) as a metaphor for the urban isolation of the immigrant experience.
left: bees and vietnamese
Bees and Vietnamese
Paul Forrer, 2002; 10m
Rittee, a Korean-Polish African American and his best friend, Naco the Crazy, find themselves in a paintball fight between immigrant war veterans from both North and South Vietnam. amaurosis
Tran
T. Kim Trang; 2002; 28m
An experimental documentary about the extraordinary creative world of Nguyen Duc Dat, a blind guitarist living in the unique community of Little Saigon, Orange County, California.
I Want to Be a Number
Jussara Figueredo, Brazil; 28m
800,000 Brazilians live in the U.S. – 150,000 of them in Massachusetts. Jussara Figueredo, a Brazilian immigrant herself, conducts interviews among Boston’s Brazilian community and finds out what makes them tick.
Thurs July 24: 6:15
PROGRAM FIVE: MIRROR CONSPIRACIES
left: amphibians by anthony goicolea
Anthony Goicolea, Shannon Plumb, & Chris Larson – 80m
Crack new-century work by top-shelf NYC gallery artists playing their own inimitable multiple selves. Goicolea’s fractured fairytales, Plumb’s Keatonesque dumbshows, and Larson’s post-Matthew Barney gothic form a glorious Neapolitan in three 25-minute suites, each of which features the artist in novel performative guises.
Thurs July 24: 9; Sun July 27: 2
PROGRAM SIX: THE WORLD AT NIGHT
left: napoli centrale
67m
Empty streets and absent friends. The moon a bone-white slipper in the trees. Cars sliding by like submarines. Deserts of half-light. Ghosts of course, night terrors, repetitive idiotic behavior, blessed solitude, and boredom. Your own beating heart beneath the far-off music and industrial moans. The dark unknowable bride of day.
Orange Factory
Seoungho Cho, U.S., 2002; 11m
NYC
Doug Aitken/Associates in Science, U.S., 2002; 4m
Ri-‘pEt
Christine Knoll, Torsten Frank, and Christian Gölz, Germany, 2002; 8m
Nocturne
Emily Richardson, U.K., 2002; 5m
Night Out
Francis Gomila, U.K., 2002; 12m
Nuclear Train
Daniel Saul, U.K., 2002; 10m
Napoli Centrale
Bouchra Khalili, France, 2002; 8m
37th & Lex
Leighton Pierce, U.S., 2002; 4m
September 10 2001, Uno nunca muere la vispera
Monika Bravo, U.S., 2001; 5m
Fri July 25: 6:15
PROGRAM SEVEN: VISUAL RADIO
Music videos carry within them codes – signals that we can pick up in both the sound and the image. These codes are an important form of communication between the musicians and the visual artists with whom they collaborate. The quality of these coded messages transforms the technology into transcendent, radiant energy from which the term radio derives. In exploring this idea, Armond White, cultural critic for The New York Press, presents his most visionary survey of music videos yet. Artists from Scarface to DJ Shadow, Johnny Cash to Kylie Minogue communicate cultural, political and spiritual ideas through a high level of graphic imagination and exciting, real-world perception. Just as pop music constantly remakes radio content, videomakers redefine video as a medium for radiating emotion and experience. Come along for the ride.
Fri July 25: 9
PROGRAM EIGHT: ME AND MY CAMERA
left: paper route
92m
Going one on one or solo, five veteran videomakers tell it like it is from behind the lens. Some stories are true, some not. All, however, get to the heart of the matter.
La Tombola
Ximena Cuevas, Mexico, 2001; 7m
The Guzzler of Grizzly Manor
George Kuchar, U.S., 2002; 12m
Frozen War
John Smith, U.K., 2002; 11m
Voice Off
Donigan Cumming, Canada, 2003; 39m
Paper Route
Robert Frank, Canada, 2003; 23m
Sat July 26: 2
PROGRAM NINE: INTIMATIONS OF MORTALITY
left: suicide
85m
By spooky coincidence this year’s submissions yielded two eerily similar works by artists on opposite sides of the world: Both Suicide by Shelly Silver (U.S., 2003; 65m) and A Silent Day by Takashi Ito (Japan, 2002; 20m) depict a fictional filmmaker obsessively creating autobiographical work as she uneasily contemplates ending her life. The former, a travel diary of sorts, takes place largely in Japan and is shot through with gorgeous imagery and a probing voiceover by the American narrator that swings repeatedly from morbidity to promiscuous eroticism. The latter, which also takes place in Japan, is a poignant and luminous work that silently follows a Japanese woman making a film about her last day on earth.
Sat July 26: 4:30
PROGRAM TEN: PRETEND
left: pretend
Julie Talen, U.S., 2003; 72m
Two young sisters, their family in seeming disarray, try to do something – anything – to keep their parents together. Could a fake kidnapping work? It could, but the plan backfires when the younger sister sent out to hide in the woods really goes missing. Or did it really happen? Julie Talen, whose career as a writer for film includes collaborations with Gillan Armstrong, Paul Verhoeven and Robert Altman, explores her personal interest in the possibilities of multi-channel narrative with this contemporary fairy tale. The split screen used throughout PRETEND is not simply a device, but it is, in fact, a major component of the story. Talen experiments with point of view, stream of consciousness, and the presence of reality television in our lives and our 15 minutes of fame. A riveting first feature-length work by this gifted media-maker.
Sat July 26: 7
PROGRAM ELEVEN: HISTORY MAKES A COMEBACK
left: subtalk
98m
Where were you when the Berlin Wall fell? Get nostalgic for the end of history with this fistful of golden oldies and brand-new hits.
The Delmarva Chicken of Tomorrow
Andrea Luka Zimmerman, U.K., 2002; 15m
You are what you eat, but what puts the food on the table?
Subtalk
Abigail Child, Benton Bainbridge & Eric Rosenzweig, U.S., 2003, 4m
A note from underground.
It’s Not My Memory of It
Speculative Archive, U.S., 2003; 25m
Two documents retrieved from the dustbin of the late 20th century and one hot off the presses.
Calcutta Intersection
Alfred Guzzetti, U.S., 2003; 10m
Tuning in to the historical unconscious while life goes on as usual.
Re: The_Operation
Paul Chan, U.S., 2002; 27m
Dispatches from the front as the Bush administration mobilizes for a war without end.
Agent Orange
Mark Boswell, U.S., 2002; 5m
Methods for treating cancer in the body politic.
Remains
Sandro Aguilar, Portugal, 2002; 12m
Sifting through the debris in the aftermath.
Sat July 26: 9
PROGRAM TWELVE: LIFE IS A DREAM
left: picture book
87m
Robots of Sodom
Tom Kalin, U.S., 2003; 3m
Do you live in Manhattan or simply exist?
Beacon
Christophe Girardet & Matthius Mueller, Portugal, 2002; 15m
A reverie for a drifting life.
Security Anthem
Kent Lambert, U.S., 2003; 3m A ritual recitation of the mundane for uncertain times.
The Phantom Museum
The Brothers Quay, U.K., 2002; 11m
A nocturnal tour through artifacts devoted to life’s basic principles: birth, sex, and death.
Every Evening Freedom
Tom Kalin, U.S., 2003; 3m
Killing time in the big city.
Jungle
Random Touch, U.S., 2003, 3m
Are we having fun yet?
Picture-Book
Ed Bowes, U.S., 2003; 50m
A beguiling, visually exquisite experimental narrative exploring the irreconcilability of seeing and knowing and of the carnal and the intellectual, of the gulf between sublime beauty (the apprehension of the world and of culture) and human interiority (desire, speculation).
Sun July 27: 4:15
PROGRAM THIRTEEN: SHALL WE DANCE?
left: vb51
92m
After Many A Summer The Swan Dies: Hybrid
Yvonne Rainer, 2002; 31m
A combination of dance and literary fragments, Yvonne Rainer’s first video installation includes footage from videotaped rehearsals of her recent choreography for the White Oak dance project (commissioned by the Barishnikov Dance Foundation), as well as text and images dealing with art and politics in fin-de-siècle Vienna.
VB51
Vanessa Beecroft, 2002; 61m
Controversial as artist Vanessa Beecroft may be for her tableaux vivants of nude women in Gucci heels, there isn’t much naked flesh in VB51, her first performance documented on video. Taking inspiration from films like Last Year at Marienbad, she posits 25 beautiful women of different ages, including family members and Fassbinder icons Hanna Schygulla and Irm Hermann, in the baroque grand hall of a German castle. Beecroft creates a fascinating series of living paintings, with no defined action, no story line, and in almost total silence, interrupted occasionally by Schygulla’s reciting from Franz Schubert’s Winterreise in various languages.
Sun July 27: 6:30
“>For details see:
http://filmlinc.com/nyvf/nyvf.htm
It’s summertime – time for exploring the pleasures, both odd and profound, of the ethereal art of video. Investigate with us the mutant media spawned by video game engines. Discover new artists making the gallery scene. Check out new ways of using digital media. See how artists from many lands come to terms with their new homes. Witness politics and media converge – as if they’ve never done that before! Watch the passionate deconstruction of music videos. Meet video artists like Robert Frank, Alfred Guzzetti, and George Kuchar, as well as young upstarts. Flex your aesthetic muscles with a host of provocative new works. Videomakers are all over the map, out in force, taking a stand, making us laugh or cry, but mostly leaving us awestruck by the power of that little digital gadget. And we’ve got the tapes to prove it. This year’s edition of the world’s leading showcase dedicated to the most plastic and contemporary of art forms features works of all stripes exploring wide-ranging themes and viewpoints. With cameras in hand, these artists are capturing life as we know it or creating new realities for us to enjoy. So – enjoy!
PROGRAM ONE: INSIDE/OUTSIDE: THE SPIRITS OF PLACE
left: learning stalls
Personal Anthology – 88m
Whether bone dry or with attitude to spare, based on precise structural conceits or strung together without apparent logic, this collection of anthology format excursions mix it up.
Learning Stalls
Torsten Zenas Burns & Darrin Martin, U.S., 2003; 4 x 4m
The Chocolate Factory
Steve Reinke, Canada, 2002; 26m
Wasted
Scott Russell, Canada, 2003; 18m
Lost in Space
Tricia Middleton & Joel Taylor, Canada, 2003; 11m
Single Beds Vol. 1 Desolation
Ximena Cuevas, Mexico, 2002; 18m
Wed July 23: 6:15; Fri July 25: 4
PROGRAM TWO: GAME ENGINE
Annual sales of $11 billion and rising is one measure of the energy surging through the videogame industry. Your ardent devotion to your computer or console is another. A third is the rampant generation, often from the culture of the first-person shooter, of all the curious mutants you will see and hear about tonight. This program is a speedrun of new forms that games and gamers and gaming are driving. Wild and legendary cutscenes, recams, machinima, loops, remixes, and beyond. With commentary and special appearances by Katie Salen, Ze Frank, Cory Arcangel, Paul Marino, RedvsBlue, and more. Total Running Time: 90m.
Wed July 23: 9
PROGRAM THREE: GOING IN CIRCLES
left: london orbital
86m
London Orbital
Chris Petit and Iain Sinclair, U.K., 2002; 76m
An extraordinary and visionary work about the world’s largest bypass, the M25, London Orbital is a cinematic excursion into the futuristic literature of a century past, as well as a dialogue between two writers who are also filmmakers and vice versa. Within this dialogue they connect the dots of seemingly disparate themes – Bram Stoker’s Dracula, time and memory, the difference between film and tape, sound and image, trance states and the terror that lies beyond boredom, shopping and terrorism; Kabul and the leisure mall, plus Pinochet and Thatcher as vampire lovers.
Walking Off Court
George Barber, U.K., 2003; 10m
“It is 10 minutes long and concerns a story I saw in The Times about a tennis coach called James Goodman who had a nervous breakdown around about the time that a motorway was built right outside his house. He spent a lot of time aimlessly walking in circles around new roads and road works. I contacted him and even ended up playing tennis with him. The video is loosely the story around his experience and his changing relationship to his normal circumstances.”
Thurs July 24: 4; Sun July 27: 8:45
PROGRAM FOUR: STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND
left: permanent transit
97m
Every year 2 – 3 million people leave their country, and by the beginning of the 21st century 130 million people lived outside their homeland. Five videos capture the dreams, disappointments, achievements, fears, and hopes of some of them.
Permanent Transit
Mariam Ghani, 2001-2; 24m
A journey through 11 countries between East and West, a road movie on the state or rather statelessness of the exiled, the refugee, and the itinerant.
Underground: Letter from an Immigrant
Ashraf Meer, 2002; 8m
An expressionistic meditation on London, using “The Tube” (London’s subway) as a metaphor for the urban isolation of the immigrant experience.
left: bees and vietnamese
Bees and Vietnamese
Paul Forrer, 2002; 10m
Rittee, a Korean-Polish African American and his best friend, Naco the Crazy, find themselves in a paintball fight between immigrant war veterans from both North and South Vietnam. amaurosis
Tran
T. Kim Trang; 2002; 28m
An experimental documentary about the extraordinary creative world of Nguyen Duc Dat, a blind guitarist living in the unique community of Little Saigon, Orange County, California.
I Want to Be a Number
Jussara Figueredo, Brazil; 28m
800,000 Brazilians live in the U.S. – 150,000 of them in Massachusetts. Jussara Figueredo, a Brazilian immigrant herself, conducts interviews among Boston’s Brazilian community and finds out what makes them tick.
Thurs July 24: 6:15
PROGRAM FIVE: MIRROR CONSPIRACIES
left: amphibians by anthony goicolea
Anthony Goicolea, Shannon Plumb, & Chris Larson – 80m
Crack new-century work by top-shelf NYC gallery artists playing their own inimitable multiple selves. Goicolea’s fractured fairytales, Plumb’s Keatonesque dumbshows, and Larson’s post-Matthew Barney gothic form a glorious Neapolitan in three 25-minute suites, each of which features the artist in novel performative guises.
Thurs July 24: 9; Sun July 27: 2
PROGRAM SIX: THE WORLD AT NIGHT
left: napoli centrale
67m
Empty streets and absent friends. The moon a bone-white slipper in the trees. Cars sliding by like submarines. Deserts of half-light. Ghosts of course, night terrors, repetitive idiotic behavior, blessed solitude, and boredom. Your own beating heart beneath the far-off music and industrial moans. The dark unknowable bride of day.
Orange Factory
Seoungho Cho, U.S., 2002; 11m
NYC
Doug Aitken/Associates in Science, U.S., 2002; 4m
Ri-‘pEt
Christine Knoll, Torsten Frank, and Christian Gölz, Germany, 2002; 8m
Nocturne
Emily Richardson, U.K., 2002; 5m
Night Out
Francis Gomila, U.K., 2002; 12m
Nuclear Train
Daniel Saul, U.K., 2002; 10m
Napoli Centrale
Bouchra Khalili, France, 2002; 8m
37th & Lex
Leighton Pierce, U.S., 2002; 4m
September 10 2001, Uno nunca muere la vispera
Monika Bravo, U.S., 2001; 5m
Fri July 25: 6:15
PROGRAM SEVEN: VISUAL RADIO
Music videos carry within them codes – signals that we can pick up in both the sound and the image. These codes are an important form of communication between the musicians and the visual artists with whom they collaborate. The quality of these coded messages transforms the technology into transcendent, radiant energy from which the term radio derives. In exploring this idea, Armond White, cultural critic for The New York Press, presents his most visionary survey of music videos yet. Artists from Scarface to DJ Shadow, Johnny Cash to Kylie Minogue communicate cultural, political and spiritual ideas through a high level of graphic imagination and exciting, real-world perception. Just as pop music constantly remakes radio content, videomakers redefine video as a medium for radiating emotion and experience. Come along for the ride.
Fri July 25: 9
PROGRAM EIGHT: ME AND MY CAMERA
left: paper route
92m
Going one on one or solo, five veteran videomakers tell it like it is from behind the lens. Some stories are true, some not. All, however, get to the heart of the matter.
La Tombola
Ximena Cuevas, Mexico, 2001; 7m
The Guzzler of Grizzly Manor
George Kuchar, U.S., 2002; 12m
Frozen War
John Smith, U.K., 2002; 11m
Voice Off
Donigan Cumming, Canada, 2003; 39m
Paper Route
Robert Frank, Canada, 2003; 23m
Sat July 26: 2
PROGRAM NINE: INTIMATIONS OF MORTALITY
left: suicide
85m
By spooky coincidence this year’s submissions yielded two eerily similar works by artists on opposite sides of the world: Both Suicide by Shelly Silver (U.S., 2003; 65m) and A Silent Day by Takashi Ito (Japan, 2002; 20m) depict a fictional filmmaker obsessively creating autobiographical work as she uneasily contemplates ending her life. The former, a travel diary of sorts, takes place largely in Japan and is shot through with gorgeous imagery and a probing voiceover by the American narrator that swings repeatedly from morbidity to promiscuous eroticism. The latter, which also takes place in Japan, is a poignant and luminous work that silently follows a Japanese woman making a film about her last day on earth.
Sat July 26: 4:30
PROGRAM TEN: PRETEND
left: pretend
Julie Talen, U.S., 2003; 72m
Two young sisters, their family in seeming disarray, try to do something – anything – to keep their parents together. Could a fake kidnapping work? It could, but the plan backfires when the younger sister sent out to hide in the woods really goes missing. Or did it really happen? Julie Talen, whose career as a writer for film includes collaborations with Gillan Armstrong, Paul Verhoeven and Robert Altman, explores her personal interest in the possibilities of multi-channel narrative with this contemporary fairy tale. The split screen used throughout PRETEND is not simply a device, but it is, in fact, a major component of the story. Talen experiments with point of view, stream of consciousness, and the presence of reality television in our lives and our 15 minutes of fame. A riveting first feature-length work by this gifted media-maker.
Sat July 26: 7
PROGRAM ELEVEN: HISTORY MAKES A COMEBACK
left: subtalk
98m
Where were you when the Berlin Wall fell? Get nostalgic for the end of history with this fistful of golden oldies and brand-new hits.
The Delmarva Chicken of Tomorrow
Andrea Luka Zimmerman, U.K., 2002; 15m
You are what you eat, but what puts the food on the table?
Subtalk
Abigail Child, Benton Bainbridge & Eric Rosenzweig, U.S., 2003, 4m
A note from underground.
It’s Not My Memory of It
Speculative Archive, U.S., 2003; 25m
Two documents retrieved from the dustbin of the late 20th century and one hot off the presses.
Calcutta Intersection
Alfred Guzzetti, U.S., 2003; 10m
Tuning in to the historical unconscious while life goes on as usual.
Re: The_Operation
Paul Chan, U.S., 2002; 27m
Dispatches from the front as the Bush administration mobilizes for a war without end.
Agent Orange
Mark Boswell, U.S., 2002; 5m
Methods for treating cancer in the body politic.
Remains
Sandro Aguilar, Portugal, 2002; 12m
Sifting through the debris in the aftermath.
Sat July 26: 9
PROGRAM TWELVE: LIFE IS A DREAM
left: picture book
87m
Robots of Sodom
Tom Kalin, U.S., 2003; 3m
Do you live in Manhattan or simply exist?
Beacon
Christophe Girardet & Matthius Mueller, Portugal, 2002; 15m
A reverie for a drifting life.
Security Anthem
Kent Lambert, U.S., 2003; 3m A ritual recitation of the mundane for uncertain times.
The Phantom Museum
The Brothers Quay, U.K., 2002; 11m
A nocturnal tour through artifacts devoted to life’s basic principles: birth, sex, and death.
Every Evening Freedom
Tom Kalin, U.S., 2003; 3m
Killing time in the big city.
Jungle
Random Touch, U.S., 2003, 3m
Are we having fun yet?
Picture-Book
Ed Bowes, U.S., 2003; 50m
A beguiling, visually exquisite experimental narrative exploring the irreconcilability of seeing and knowing and of the carnal and the intellectual, of the gulf between sublime beauty (the apprehension of the world and of culture) and human interiority (desire, speculation).
Sun July 27: 4:15
PROGRAM THIRTEEN: SHALL WE DANCE?
left: vb51
92m
After Many A Summer The Swan Dies: Hybrid
Yvonne Rainer, 2002; 31m
A combination of dance and literary fragments, Yvonne Rainer’s first video installation includes footage from videotaped rehearsals of her recent choreography for the White Oak dance project (commissioned by the Barishnikov Dance Foundation), as well as text and images dealing with art and politics in fin-de-siècle Vienna.
VB51
Vanessa Beecroft, 2002; 61m
Controversial as artist Vanessa Beecroft may be for her tableaux vivants of nude women in Gucci heels, there isn’t much naked flesh in VB51, her first performance documented on video. Taking inspiration from films like Last Year at Marienbad, she posits 25 beautiful women of different ages, including family members and Fassbinder icons Hanna Schygulla and Irm Hermann, in the baroque grand hall of a German castle. Beecroft creates a fascinating series of living paintings, with no defined action, no story line, and in almost total silence, interrupted occasionally by Schygulla’s reciting from Franz Schubert’s Winterreise in various languages.
Sun July 27: 6:30

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